Last edited by Tezragore
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Japanese export lacquer found in the catalog.

Japanese export lacquer

O. R. Impey

Japanese export lacquer

1580-1850

by O. R. Impey

  • 20 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Hotei in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lacquer and lacquering -- Japan -- History,
  • Japan -- Commerce -- History.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 363-374) and index.

    StatementOliver Impey, Christiaan Jörg.
    ContributionsJörg, C. J. A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNK9900.7.J3 I47 2005
    The Physical Object
    Pagination384 p. :
    Number of Pages384
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22729341M
    ISBN 10907482272X

    Inlay and Inro Before the adoption of western clothing in the 19th century, Japan had to find a way to deal with the acute shortage of pockets! Other metals, shell, and colored pigments can also be sprinkled on or set into the surface. This is done by cutting 5 to 10 horizontal lines on the trunk of a year-old tree, and then collecting the greyish yellow sap that exudes. Do you have any lacquer objects in your home? This style the Momoyama period style uses thick pearl-shell inlays on a black ground and overpainting of gold lacquer.

    Nevertheless, Chinese and Japanese influences are present. This scene shows Genji walking beneath an umbrella held by his servant Koremitsu. Current taste prefers the spectacular pieces of the Meiji period. We also find a different attitude towards what marks that are put on the Japanese porcelain and in particular the export porcelain from the 19th century and onwards. The solution was the inro, a multi-layered cased, that hang off a belt. They describe the various pottery of Japan as follows: Satsuma porcelains - mainly produced in and around the city of Kagoshima in Kyushu.

    In Japan, some lacquerers made carved and painted lacquers in imitation of another material, such as the rough bark of a tree, or a bronze sword-guard or Chinese ink-cake. Alongside the red and black lacquers, it is common to see the use of inlayoften seashells or similar materials, as well as mica or other materials. Japanese pottery : with notes describing the thoughts and subjects employed in its decoration and illustrations from examples in the Bowes collection. Ryukyuan lacquerwarethough frequently included among types of Japanese lacquer, actually developed largely independently, with strong influences from China and Southeast Asia, as the Ryukyu Islands did not come under Japanese control until In the case of a particularly large or important order, craftsmen could be hired from workshops that supplied the domestic market.


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Japanese export lacquer book

In Japan, some lacquerers made carved and painted lacquers in imitation of another material, such as the rough bark of a tree, or a bronze sword-guard or Chinese ink-cake.

See also. Screens and small polygonal tables are also made for the tourist trade today. Lacquer Furniture There are endless possibilities for the use and decoration of lacquer. Since plastics, porcelain and metal have superseded lacquer in most everyday utensils, it is today manufactured in large workshops mainly for tourists who come to see the ancient temples of Bagan.

How to Create the Japanese Lacquer Look & Finish

After many years of a strict regulation in the Edo perioda new Meiji government finally opened a door to the oversea trade. The style originated with the family, whose kilns were the main producers of it, but other kilns also made it, and the Kakiemon kilns made other styles.

Americas[ edit ] Barniz de Pasto technique[ edit ] Barniz de Pasto es is a lacquer-like varnish technique originating in the Pre-Columbian era that is a specialty of Pasto, Colombia. Buy it while you can.

Lacquerware

An object is formed from wood, sometimes leather, paper, or basketry. Combination of any technique The Japanese lacquerers often used a combination of any or all of these techniques, making objects of great refinement and skill.

This style the Momoyama period style uses thick pearl-shell inlays on a black ground and overpainting of gold lacquer. In order to help Japanese craftsmen working in unfamiliar forms, either drawings, wooden models or, more rarely, wooden carcasses were sent to aid them. In some cases, burial clothes for the dead were also lacquered.

The Mazarin Chest The Mazarin Chest is extraordinary for its size and the richness of its lacquer decoration. History[ edit ] According to tradition, the Korean potter Yi Sam-pyeong d.

Melanorrhoea usitata that grows wild in the forests of Myanmar formerly Burma. The underside of the box's lid is inscribed with the name Maria van Diemen, wife of Anton van Diemen, the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies from to Water carafes or yeidagaung with Japanese export lacquer book cup doubling as a lid, and vases are also among lacquerware still in use in many monasteries.

The final layers require the finest quality lacquer, which is filtered many times to remove impurities. Evidence for the earliest lacquerware was discovered at the Kakinoshima "B" Excavation Site in Hokkaido.

Carved and painted lacquer One variation of carved lacquer was easier and cheaper than true carved lacquer. Most export lacquer was made in western forms that were unfamiliar to Japanese craftsmen. Lacquer, one of Japan's traditional crafts, had been virtually unknown in Europe. The use of lacquer in Japan can be traced back to the first millennium BC, the mid to late Jomon period.

The booklet seems to date to the mid-late s. It was also widely imitated in Europe, and sometimes in China. Mostly these were cabinets and chests in shapes conforming to European usage.

This cabinet is nearly identical to one in the collection of Queen Marie Antoinette French, — and may have been owned by her.Export Lacquer: Reflections of the West in Black and Gold Makie Meiko Nagashima Beautifully illustrated and fully translated, this multilingual volume is a catalogue of the original Japanese exhibition.

(Paperback, $45) Published by The Yomiuri Shimbun, Osaka. Available from the Getty Bookstore by calling () A JAPANESE EXPORT GILT-METAL-MOUNTED BLACK, GOLD AND NASHIJI LACQUER CABINET EDO PERIOD, CIRCA Decorated in various lacquer techniques, including Nashiji, of rectangular form, the top, doors and sides decorated in relief with birds, cockerels and peacocks within exotic foliate and rockwork landscapes, a pond to the front, the doors with engraved angle mounts and spade.

Japan 蒔絵: 宮殿を飾る東洋の燦めき = Export lacquer: reflection of the West in black and gold makie / Japan makie: kyūden o kazaru Tōyō no kirameki = Export lacquer: reflection of. His research focuses on Chinese and Japanese export art for the Dutch market for the periodin particular porcelain and lacquer.

His publications include Porcelain and the Dutch China Trade (); Interaction in Ceramics. Oriental Porcelain & Dutch Delftware (); The atlasbowling.com: C.J.A.

Jörg. This was the area where the great majority of early Japanese porcelain, especially Japanese export porcelain, was made. In English usage "Arita ware" was traditionally used for the export wares in blue and white porcelain, mostly copying Chinese styles. The wares with added overglaze colours were called Imari ware or (a sub-group) Kakiemon.

This exhibition presents examples of Japanese lacquer objects from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

The lustre and allure of Japanese lacquer

Made in Japan—some specifically for export to Europe—these objects were popular among wealthy European collectors from the 17th to 19th centuries. The art form has had a major impact on both the fine and decorative arts.